THINK BIG BY BEN CARSON BOOK

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Think Big book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers . This book is for you if your life is a series of shattered dreams. This. Think Big [Ben Carson] on techetolyson.cf *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Think Big: Unleashing Your Potential for Excellence [Ben Carson M.D., Cecil Murphey] on techetolyson.cf *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This book is for .


Think Big By Ben Carson Book

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The author of this book knows about hardship. Ben Carson grew up in inner-city Detroit. His mother was illiterate. His father had left the family. His grade-school. Think big: unleashing your potential for excellence / by Ben Carson with Cecil Murphey. It is also a book about people who give their best and who Think Big. Yesterday i was re-reading the book called "The gifted hand" by Ben Carson who the best selling author and youth role model. He is also recognized.

This book is such a motivator and inspiration for people who want to go far in life. View 1 comment. Jun 05, Suzanne rated it really liked it Shelves: A couple of years ago, I had the opportunity watch a wonderful movie about the life of Dr. Ben Carson. It was called Gifted Hands and it chronicled his rise from bottom of the class fifth grader in a poor single parent household, to brilliant pediatric neurosurgeon at Johns Hopkins.

Later, I found out that Dr.

Carson had written several books intended to inspire young people to reach for their full potential. Yesterday, I have been thinking that my own sons could benefit from Dr. Carson's message A couple of years ago, I had the opportunity watch a wonderful movie about the life of Dr.

Carson's message. So I picked up Think Big , and read it in one day. Today I will hand it to my oldest son and I look forward to discussing the important messages in the book.

This book is about becoming the best person you can be. While Dr. Carson incorporates the wisdom of honesty, helping others and understanding that God plays a major role in our lives, his strongest message is the importance of learning by reading. Is it unhealthy to read too much?

Do we really need to learn so much anyway? I enjoyed Dr.

Carson's refutations: This divinely created brain has fourteen billion cells. If used to the maximum, this human computer inside our heads could contain all the knowledge of humanity from the beginning of the world to the present and still have room left over. One of the wonderful things about learning is that knowledge not only translates from from area to another but is also an avenue that leads to understanding and insight. Carson goes on to provide examples supporting this claim.

I thoroughly enjoyed the stories from his own life and I am hopeful that they will resonate with students - especially my own children. As a person who loves reading and knowledge, I am troubled by the attitude of those who claim not to enjoy reading. I think Dr. Carson is very perceptive when he claims that the more a person reads, the more they will enjoy it.

Ultimately, it is reading that will change a person's life. This an ideal book for students and parents alike. It encourages us to be more than we thought possible.

Mar 20, M. This book reads like an acceptance speech at some major awards ceremony, giving thanks to all the people involved in making Dr Carson's life what it is today. No doubt he is a very impressive man with all he was able to accomplish at such a young age, but even more impressive is the credit he gives to others, never coming off as haughty despite all the success he has had.

It's an amazing book that simply inpsires and motivates you to give your best in life! No matter from where your come from or your background, anyone can success if they give their best. Apr 18, Mary rated it liked it Recommends it for: Honestly I never would have picked up this book if it weren't for the fact that a lecturer prescribed it for one of my classes.

I'm not one for self-help or motivational books. I find the tedious and really not all that motivational. I prefer fiction, and as I said I really don't think I would have picked it up, let alone have enjoyed it the way I did. I'd heard about Ben Carson those who haven't have probably been living under a rock , but I never really took interest in his books or the movie a Honestly I never would have picked up this book if it weren't for the fact that a lecturer prescribed it for one of my classes.

I'd heard about Ben Carson those who haven't have probably been living under a rock , but I never really took interest in his books or the movie adaptation of his memoir. I rally should have, I was really pleasantly surprised when I found myself actually getting drawn in.

I found myself identifying with him, and relating to his stories He had a way of telling his story in a very relatable and interesting, while still filling you with knowledge at the same time. I'm not a medical student , but I always find the human body to be fascinating, so I really liked how he stayed true to his medical roots and gave us a little snippet of how our brains function.

Not only did I come out of this really motivated and actually inspired, I came out of this knowledgeable. It really opened up my mind, in the sense that I shouldn't just write off a book just because of the genre or type.

I'm very curious and I want to read more about Ben Carson. I would seriously recommend Everyone read this, regardless of your age or where you're from, or whatever.

It's an amazing book that will make you reevaluate a lot of things, especially in the way you tHink. I read this in high school way before be went political.

The T stands for talent. I really enjoyed this book. It does repeat a few stories from his other books. This man is very wise and offers a lot of truth that can be applied to all lives. As I write this I see that Ben Carson is gaining in the polls as a presidential candidate. I think he would be an excellent president and is what this country needs.

I trust you will enjoy and be challenged by the quotes below: If things go bad for you- And make you a bit ashamed, Often you will find out that You have yourself to blame … Swiftly we ran to mischief And then the bad luck came. Why do we fault others? We were black, but that did not mean we were dumb and supposed to fail.

God loves everybody and wants only good things for us. Maybe God made it for a special measurement just to see if we could really love someone who is different from us. For anyone who does not love his brother, whom he has seen, cannot love God, whom he has not seen. And He has given us this command: There is value in the wrong way of doing things. The knowledge gained from errors contributes to our knowledge base.

Everybody is important. Each is given a bag of tools, A shapeless mass, A book of rules; And each must make- Ere life is flown- A stumbling block Or a steppingstone. Sharpe No one can make us feel inferior without our permission. God be thanked for books. They are the voices of the distant and the dead, and make us heirs of the spiritual life of past ages.

Books are true levelers. They give to all, who will faithfully use them, the society, the spiritual presence, of the best and greatest of our race. Reading activates and exercise the mind. Reading forces the mind to discriminate. From the beginning, readers have to recognize letters printed on the page, make them into words, the words into sentences, and the sentences into concepts.

Reading pushes us to use our imagination and makes us more creatively inclined. When books are opened, we discover that we have wings. More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of. Humility is not groveling and telling everyone how worthless we are — humility is knowing who we are and what God is doing and has done in our lives. I have worked out a simple formula for humility. God created this universe, including us, and 2.

God shows that He is much more powerful than we are by what He does and has done in our world, and 3. Remaining a victim of circumstance is a state of being that we choose, a choice that - allows us to blame other people - lets us blame circumstances - permits us to avoid responsibility for our lives - encourages us to feel sorry for ourselves, and - guarantees that we will stay victims.

No one has to be a victim! To some, success in life means putting more into life than we take out. I think of success as reaching beyond ourselves and helping other people in specific ways. View all 4 comments. Jul 06, Glenn rated it it was ok. I was introduced to this book by a junior high school teacher who was planning to use it in her classes.

Supposedly it was about a successful pediatric neurosurgeon giving accolades to people who helped him develop himself.

Think Big: Unleashing Your Potential for Excellence

That attracted me since I also feel such intense gratitude for so many, some that I am aware of, and some that I never realized were there. I will say he delivers that, and also provides some very good ideas about how to get on track and stay on track for "success".

I rated t I was introduced to this book by a junior high school teacher who was planning to use it in her classes. I rated the book lower because there is a little too much about Ben Carson in the book for me, and a few too many references to the times he "said a little prayer and his patient miraculously and immediately turned for the better".

I just felt like he, not infrequently, plugged his own accomplishments sort of gratuitously. And I think there have to be some examples not mentioned when he "said a little prayer" and the patient went on to a tragic outcome.

Not to overstate that, though, and I have recommended the book to several people--especially to parents of preteens who might be inspired by what he has to say. It is a fairly well-written book, and easy to read.

Jul 01, Jared Della Rocca rated it did not like it Shelves: By all means you may judge this book by its cover, because your judgement will be spot on. I mean, even being ghostwritten, this book was just really not good. From the abrupt shift of chapters - starting with Ben Carson, then weirdly switching to his Mom writing a chapter or two - then back to Ben Carson, it never really had a timeline to it. It was like Ben Carson really wanted to emphasize how other people and God helped him get where he was, but never really considered the best way to transl By all means you may judge this book by its cover, because your judgement will be spot on.

It was like Ben Carson really wanted to emphasize how other people and God helped him get where he was, but never really considered the best way to translate that, other than repeating it constantly every other paragraph. Not worth the time at all. Jul 03, Tyler Barker rated it it was amazing. Ben Carson is a truly inspiring man. He writes his personal story from the inner city and underachieving school life to the top of the neuroscience medicine. He gives all the glory to God and includes wonderful scriptures to live by.

Benjamin, she said, are these your grades? Knowing I was in for it now, I prepared to listen, yet I was not all that interested. I did not like school very much and there was no reason why I should. Inasmuch as I was the dumbest kid in the class, what did I have to look forward to? The others laughed at me and made jokes about me every day. Do you understand that?

I hung my head, genuinely ashamed. My mother had been raising me and my older brother, Curtis, by herself. Having only a third-grade education herself, she knew the value of what she did not have. Daily she drummed into Curtis and me that we had to do our best in school. How could I do much when I did not understand anything going on in our class?

My parents had separated just before we went to Boston, when I was eight years old. I loved both my mother and father and went through considerable trauma over their separating. For months afterward, I kept thinking that my parents would get back together, that my daddy would come home again the way he used to, and that we could be the same old family again — but he never came back. Consequently, we moved to Boston and lived with Aunt Jean and Uncle William Avery in a tenement building for two years until Mother had saved enough money to bring us back to Detroit.

Mother kept shaking the report card at me as she sat on the side of my bed.

You have to work harder. You have to use that good brain that God gave you, Bennie. I work among rich people, people who are educated, she said. I watch how they act, and I know they can do anything they want to do. And so can you. She put her arm on my shoulder. Bennie, you can do anything they can do — only you can do it better!

Mother had said those words before. At the time, they did not mean much to me. Why should they? I really believed that I was the dumbest kid in fifth grade, but of course, I never told her that.

As soon as I came home from school, I changed into play clothes and ran outside. Most of the boys my age played softball, or the game I liked best, Tip the Top. We played Tip the Top by placing a bottle cap on one of the sidewalk cracks. Whoever succeeded got two points. If anyone actually moved the cap more than a few inches, he won five points. Ten points came if he flipped it into the air and it landed on the other side. When it grew dark or we got tired, Curtis and I would finally go inside and watch TV.

The set stayed on until we went to bed. Because Mother worked long hours, she was never home until just before we went to bed. Sometimes I would awaken when I heard her unlocking the door.

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Two evenings after the incident with the report card, Mother came home about an hour before our bedtime. Curtis and I were sprawled out, watching TV. She walked across the room, snapped off the set, and faced both of us. Before either of us could make a protest, she told us that she had been praying for wisdom.

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So from now on, you will not watch television, except for two preselected programs each week. I could hardly believe she would say such a terrible thing.

That may be, Mother said, but everybody else is not going to be as successful as you are —. I tried to offer several other arguments, but Mother was firm. I glanced at Curtis, expecting him to speak up, but he did not say anything. He lay on the floor, staring at his feet.

But only a few make a significant achievement. The loss of TV and play time was bad enough. I got up off the floor, feeling as if everything was against me. She was stopping me from having any fun in life. In addition, she said, to doing your homework, you have to read two books from the library each week.

Every single week. Two books? Even though I was in fifth grade, I had never read a whole book in my life. Yes, two. When you finish reading them, you must write me a book report just like you do at school. Usually Curtis, who was two years older, was the more rebellious.

But this time he seemed to grasp the wisdom of what Mother said. He did not say one word. Yes, Mother. Mother was being unfair and demanding more of us than other parents did.

The following day was Thursday. After school, Curtis and I walked to the local branch of the library. I did not like it much, but then I had not spent that much time in any library. She led me over to a section of books. She left me and guided Curtis to another section of the room. I flipped through the row of books until I found two that looked easy enough for me to read.

One of them, Chip, the Dam Builder — about a beaver — was the first one I had ever checked out. As soon as I got home, I started to read it. It was the first book I ever read all the way through even though it took me two nights. Reluctantly I admitted afterward to Mother that I really had liked reading about Chip. By then the library staff knew Curtis and me and the kind of books we chose. They often made suggestions.

As she told me part of the story, I tried to appear indifferent, but as soon as she handed it to me, I opened the book and started to read. Best of all, we became favorites of the librarians. When new books came in that they thought either of us would enjoy, they held them for us. Soon I became fascinated as I realized that the library had so many books — and about so many different subjects.

After the book about the beaver, I chose others about animals — all types of animals. I read every animal story I could get my hands on. I read books about wolves, wild dogs, several about squirrels, and a variety of animals that lived in other countries. Once I had gone through the animal books, I started reading about plants, then minerals, and finally rocks. Inside these pages lie the keys to recognizing the full potential of your life.

You won't necessarily become a millionaire though you might , but you will attain a life that is rewarding, significant, and more fruitful than you ever thought possible.

The author of this book knows about hardship. Ben Carson grew up in inner-city Detroit. His mother was illiterate. His father had left the family.English Download options: John Turnipseed. Nov 24, Alex Timberman rated it it was amazing Shelves: When Breath Becomes Air. You can do anything you want to do, I did not believe her. He learned that he had potential, he learned how to unleash it, and he did. I will say he delivers that, and also provides some very good ideas about how to get on track and stay on track for "success".

Carson's book "Gifted Hands" back in middle school, and thought this book was going to be different. He also wrote that, it can makes you be successful in everything you touch. In addition, she said, to doing your homework, you have to read two books from the library each week.

ALMA from Tucson
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